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Two Girls…

Tumblr has been a fun vacation and has kicked my posting habit back up. Thanks for the treat; it’s time to head back home.

Tags: blogging
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May 10, 2012

Dear Sir,

Enclosed you will find a check in the amount of $29.97, in response to your invoice of April 30, 2012.

Please be advised that although this invoice indicates “5th - and final - notice”, it is the first piece of such correspondence that I have received from you.

I do not read your magazine; it is transferred from my mailbox to the recycling bin each Wednesday evening without exception. I therefore trust that you will consider this payment an acceptable settlement of all debts that you may henceforth claim, and that you will settle the case by severing this connection.

Graciously,
Ms. M L ——

May 10, 2012

Dear Sir,

Enclosed you will find a check in the amount of $29.97, in response to your invoice of April 30, 2012.

Please be advised that although this invoice indicates “5th - and final - notice”, it is the first piece of such correspondence that I have received from you.

I do not read your magazine; it is transferred from my mailbox to the recycling bin each Wednesday evening without exception. I therefore trust that you will consider this payment an acceptable settlement of all debts that you may henceforth claim, and that you will settle the case by severing this connection.

Graciously,
Ms. M L ——

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Maybe i’m old-fashioned, but my favorite photos of us (apart from those taken by Chris Chin) are sepia-toned.

Maybe i’m old-fashioned, but my favorite photos of us (apart from those taken by Chris Chin) are sepia-toned.

Tags: love
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O, little Phil.

This philodendron has survived a great deal of tumult. He was once a large, viney plant with numerous shoots and leaves. 

When I moved us all to Brooklyn three years ago, Stumpy Freedom decided that Phil was the tastiest snack, and chewed off many of its vines. In an effort to protect him from her teeth, claws, and appetite, I moved Phil to a high shelf with lovely indirect sunlight - where he fell victim to my neglect. Phil withered, shrank, and nearly died from thirst, until Corrin rescued him, trimming away dead stems and leaves, soaking the pot, and generally making the poor thing as comfortable as could be.

Then the move to Manhattan last June nearly decapitated him; the pot tipped over and severed all but one brave little leaf from a tiny sliver of root. Not willing to give up on him, we created a watery home for Phil; he spent ten months with his little root swimming in a glass and growing long and strong, and doubling his number of tiny, glossy leaves.

In early April, we repotted him into this tiny pot and set a friendly Otter stone to keep him company. He’s gained another two leaves and chirked up nicely; you can see from the itsy bitsy shoot in the center that he’s still in a bit of a growth spurt.

Here’s to perseverance!

O, little Phil.

This philodendron has survived a great deal of tumult. He was once a large, viney plant with numerous shoots and leaves.

When I moved us all to Brooklyn three years ago, Stumpy Freedom decided that Phil was the tastiest snack, and chewed off many of its vines. In an effort to protect him from her teeth, claws, and appetite, I moved Phil to a high shelf with lovely indirect sunlight - where he fell victim to my neglect. Phil withered, shrank, and nearly died from thirst, until Corrin rescued him, trimming away dead stems and leaves, soaking the pot, and generally making the poor thing as comfortable as could be.

Then the move to Manhattan last June nearly decapitated him; the pot tipped over and severed all but one brave little leaf from a tiny sliver of root. Not willing to give up on him, we created a watery home for Phil; he spent ten months with his little root swimming in a glass and growing long and strong, and doubling his number of tiny, glossy leaves.

In early April, we repotted him into this tiny pot and set a friendly Otter stone to keep him company. He’s gained another two leaves and chirked up nicely; you can see from the itsy bitsy shoot in the center that he’s still in a bit of a growth spurt.

Here’s to perseverance!

Tags: plants
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Since leaving school, I’ve used my Birthday as an annual point at which I can take stock and determine what elements of my life aren’t in sync with my dreams. One thing that I’m less than pleased with right now is my level of physical activity.
Corrin jokingly asked if I’d like a gold star for choosing to exercise, then we rather quickly and over-excitedly conceived of a “star chart” for the fridge. I scrapbooked this together on Saturday night - the font was clearly inspired by my Hobbity Birthday Party - and Corrin bought gold foil star stickers yesterday.
So far it’s working; I scootered to the office this morning!
Thanks for taking the picture, lovey.

Since leaving school, I’ve used my Birthday as an annual point at which I can take stock and determine what elements of my life aren’t in sync with my dreams. One thing that I’m less than pleased with right now is my level of physical activity.

Corrin jokingly asked if I’d like a gold star for choosing to exercise, then we rather quickly and over-excitedly conceived of a “star chart” for the fridge. I scrapbooked this together on Saturday night - the font was clearly inspired by my Hobbity Birthday Party - and Corrin bought gold foil star stickers yesterday.

So far it’s working; I scootered to the office this morning!

Thanks for taking the picture, lovey.

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Poor Mac. I’ve felt terrible all day, so have alternately napped, whined, and distracted myself with a beloved childhood story — Louisa May Alcott’s Eight Cousins. The scene depicted above, where gentle Rose attempts to soothe and comfort afflicted Mac was a sweet bit of balm. I’m one of the demented few who truly enjoy earnest, heart-felt books, with their little flaws and foibles fully intact — so sinking into the story was good for me today.

Poor Mac. I’ve felt terrible all day, so have alternately napped, whined, and distracted myself with a beloved childhood story — Louisa May Alcott’s Eight Cousins. The scene depicted above, where gentle Rose attempts to soothe and comfort afflicted Mac was a sweet bit of balm. I’m one of the demented few who truly enjoy earnest, heart-felt books, with their little flaws and foibles fully intact — so sinking into the story was good for me today.

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Morningside Park is so lush and green right now - thanks to mild temperatures and rain. I love the way the stone walls seem to be creeping up from the greenery.

Morningside Park is so lush and green right now - thanks to mild temperatures and rain. I love the way the stone walls seem to be creeping up from the greenery.

Tags: nature nyc
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I celebrated my birthday yesterday with a shopping adventure throughout midtown. It was gray and wet, with hints of fog.

I took this photo at the corner of Twenty-Eighth Street and Fifth Avenue. I can’t decide on my favorite part: the fog in front of the Empire State Building, the bright red walk signal, or the looming buildings in the foreground.

I celebrated my birthday yesterday with a shopping adventure throughout midtown. It was gray and wet, with hints of fog.

I took this photo at the corner of Twenty-Eighth Street and Fifth Avenue. I can’t decide on my favorite part: the fog in front of the Empire State Building, the bright red walk signal, or the looming buildings in the foreground.

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They Fit!

Dad in his Father’s Day Socks.

They Fit!

Dad in his Father’s Day Socks.

Tags: knitting socks
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3KCBWDAY3: My Knitting Heroes

"Blog about someone in the fibre crafts who truly inspires you." There are a lot of people in the yarn and knitting world who inspire me.

My amazing friend Phoebe, who can spin her own fibre and knit a sweater without a pattern, is at the top of the list.

Every person with the guts to start an Etsy shop, selling his or her own wares to the public, and Dona of Yarntopia, who started a bricks and mortar shop in New York City.

Lovely bloggers who share glimpses of their lives along with stories about their craft — ladies like Anne of Knitspot, Karie of The Fourth Edition, Saffron formerly of Mooncalf Makes, Mimi of Eskimimi Makes (the founder of international Knit and Crochet Blog Week), and Tami of Tami’s Amis.

But the people who most surprise me, the ones who inspire me quietly and gently, often without either of us noticing it, are the Subway Knitters of New York City. The women and men who go about their days with a project bag secreted about their person, knitting needles ready to be taken up at a moment’s notice. They’ll tuck themselves into corner seats, perch against center poles, brace themselves against doors, or effortlessly surf, stealing moments from their “wasted” commutes to create something beautiful, comforting, silly, or sweet.

I’ve always been a little bit in love with the lives of ordinary people, and nothing makes me feel quite as close to that as pulling out my own project bag and my own set of tiny DPNs, and smiling at the knitter across the car.

This is another post for the third annual Knitting and Crochet Blog Week series. If you’re so inclined, you can read about other participants’ knitting heroes, too.